Tim Scott

Tim Scott

  • R-SC, Senator2013 – present
  • R-SC, 1st District2011 – 2012
Tim Scott's photo

Score (Avg: 84%)

YearScore
201195%
201290%
201386%
2014100%
201587%
201673%
201790%
201863%
201978%

Key Voting Record

Ineligible / Out of OfficeDid Not Vote
Voted with FreedomWorks principlesAnti-Freedom Vote

Key Vote Description

Legislator Score / Vote

2019: 116th Congress 78%

  • 1: On the Conference Report: Consolidated Appropriations Act - H.J.Res. 31Nay

    Key Vote 1: On the Conference Report: Consolidated Appropriations Act - H.J.Res. 31

    In the new House Democrat rules package, Democrats tried to sell the idea that leadership under them would be different than leadership under former Speaker Paul Ryan. One change made to sell this lie was expanding the “three-day rule” meant to require ample time for members to consider legislation before voting on it to a full 72 hours. Unsurprisingly, this rule hasn’t been adhered to very frequently thus far into the 116th Congress, and this spending package is no exception. Just as House Republican leadership in March 2018 dropped the text of a 2,232-page omnibus spending bill less than 24 hours before forcing members to vote on it — ignoring the three-day rule in the process — House Democratic leadership is today doing the same. Likely fewer than 12 hours will have passed between members laying eyes on this bill and members casting their votes on it. This means that nobody will have read it and nobody will be fully aware of what is in it, but, of course, members will be told they need to support it or be blamed for another shutdown. This is simply no way to govern.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 2: On the Nomination: Andrew Wheeler to Serve as Administrator of the Environmental Protection AgencyYea

    Key Vote 2: On the Nomination: Andrew Wheeler to Serve as Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency

    Acting EPA Administration Andrew Wheeler has done a phenomenal job balancing protecting the environment and abiding by his constitutional obligations, all while preserving free market principles He will no doubt add to that legacy as full-time Administrator. Acting Administrator Wheeler recognizes that Washington bureaucrats do not know what’s best for America’s businesses, and does not try to run their companies. Instead, he gives the private sector the flexibility it needs to efficiently lower emissions and find the most cost-effective way to help the environment. He also understands that property rights are fundamental to our liberty and that government agencies have no business regulating our backyards.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 3: On the Nomination: Neomi Rao to Serve as a Judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. CircuitYea

    Key Vote 3: On the Nomination: Neomi Rao to Serve as a Judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit

    As the administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA), Neomi Rao was charged with overseeing the implementation of government policies and reviewing draft regulations. This experience makes her uniquely qualified to assess the constitutionality of government regulations. Rao also founded the Center for the Study of the Administrative State at the Antonin Scalia Law School. There is perhaps no judicial nominee better positioned to reign in the excesses of the federal bureaucracy. Given this history, Neomi Rao is a fantastic pick and will carry on Brett Kavanaugh’s legacy on the D.C. Circuit of reigning in the excesses of the administrative state. She was already leading the way on regulatory reform as the head of OIRA facilitating billions in reduced regulatory economic burdens over the last two years. Now she has the opportunity to do so from the bench and set precedents that cannot be easily undone by future administrations.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 4: On the Cloture Motion: Green New Deal Resolution - S.J.Res. 8Nay

    Key Vote 4: On the Cloture Motion: Green New Deal Resolution - S.J.Res. 8

    The “Green New Deal” resolution seeks to transition America’s mostly free market economy into a socialist economy, bordering on full-fledged communism. The so-called “Green New Deal” is not grounded in any sense of reality. By one unofficial estimate, the resolution’s goals of government-run healthcare, a complete transition to renewable energy, “free” college for all, and universal basic income would cost $6.6 trillion annually, or 31 percent of projected gross domestic product (GDP) for 2019. To put this into perspective, the Congressional Budget Office projects that federal spending in 2019 will total $4.4 trillion, or 20.8 percent of GDP. This unofficial estimate does not include retrofitting or rebuilding every single building in the United States, a high-speed rail system that promises to make air travel unnecessary while ignoring the existence of oceans (sorry, Hawaii), increased subsidies for electric vehicles -- which currently draw their power from a grid fueled predominantly by a combination of coal, natural gas, and oil-fired electric power plants -- to replace all of the gas-fueled vehicles currently on the road, or any of the other unicorns promised to come down this socialist rainbow.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 5: On Overriding the Veto: Yemen War Powers Resolution - S.J.Res. 7Nay

    Key Vote 5: On Overriding the Veto: Yemen War Powers Resolution - S.J.Res. 7

    The Yemen War Powers Resolution, which has already been passed by both chambers of Congress, would require the removal of undeclared, unauthorized United States’ support for the Saudi-led coalition in Yemen absent explicit congressional authorization.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 6: On the Nomination: Kimberly Reed to Serve as President of the Export-Import BankYea

    Key Vote 6: On the Nomination: Kimberly Reed to Serve as President of the Export-Import Bank

    The Export-Import Bank has operated without a quorum since July 2015. That should not change. The Export-Import Bank has been the face of cronyism, and, with a reauthorization deadline looming, conservatives and libertarians must push back against congressional attempts to reestablish a quorum and reauthorize the Bank.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 7: On the Nomination: Spencer Bachus to Serve as a Member of the Board of Directors of the Export-Import BankYea

    Key Vote 7: On the Nomination: Spencer Bachus to Serve as a Member of the Board of Directors of the Export-Import Bank

    The Export-Import Bank has operated without a quorum since July 2015. That should not change. The Export-Import Bank has been the face of cronyism, and, with a reauthorization deadline looming, conservatives and libertarians must push back against congressional attempts to reestablish a quorum and reauthorize the Bank.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 8: On the Nomination: Judith DelZoppo Pryor to Serve as a Member of the Board of Directors to the Export-Import BankYea

    Key Vote 8: On the Nomination: Judith DelZoppo Pryor to Serve as a Member of the Board of Directors to the Export-Import Bank

    The Export-Import Bank has operated without a quorum since July 2015. That should not change. The Export-Import Bank has been the face of cronyism, and, with a reauthorization deadline looming, conservatives and libertarians must push back against congressional attempts to reestablish a quorum and reauthorize the Bank.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 9: On Passage of the Bill: Supplemental Appropriations Act - H.R. 2157Yea

    Key Vote 9: On Passage of the Bill: Supplemental Appropriations Act - H.R. 2157

    The Supplemental Appropriations Act would provide for an additional $17.2 billion in emergency relief funds with no offsets, although the Disaster Relief Fund still has more than $29 billion in it. The bill would also further other big-government policies, including duplicative agriculture subsidies, National Flood Insurance Program reauthorization, and community development block grant spending. This bill, which is a modified and worsened version of another supplemental appropriations bill, H.R. 268, that passed the House in January. H.R. 2157 spends close to 50 percent more than H.R. 268 despite, again, no new funds being requested for these disasters. Because it will be brought to the floor as an emergency supplemental, the spending in it is also exempt from the Budget Control Act discretionary spending caps. Furthermore, H.R. 2157 would also ramp up agriculture subsidies that already distort the market and amount to no better than other defunct welfare programs. With $22 trillion of national debt and more being added with each passing day, we need to be spending more, not less. At the very least, we need to fully and honestly offset any new federal spending with further spending cuts.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 10: On Cloture on the Motion to Proceed: Pennies Plan Balanced Budget - S. 1332Yea

    Key Vote 10: On Cloture on the Motion to Proceed: Pennies Plan Balanced Budget - S. 1332

    Introduced by Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), the Pennies Plan Balanced Budget would cut two cents for every dollar of on-budget spending beginning in FY 2020. This would balance the federal budget by FY 2024, without making any changes to Social Security. Sen. Paul’s Pennies Plan Balanced Budget would address the concerning growth of federal spending by cutting two pennies from every dollar of on-budget spending. This would reduce on-budget spending by $183.1 billion in FY 2020 and $11.3 trillion in the unified budget. Although federal spending will be reduced under this budget proposal, federal spending will still rise by 18.2 percent over the budget window. The spending levels under the budget resolution would be enforceable under a point of order requiring five-eighths of members present and voting to waive. The Pennies Plan Balanced Budget includes reconciliation instructions to the Senate Finance Committee to extend the individual income tax reforms, including the pass-through changes, under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017. The budget resolution also includes a reserve fund for the expansion of health savings accounts. This is a crucial health insurance reform that will put people in charge of their healthcare dollars and lower overall healthcare costs.

    "Yea" votes scored. Double Score
  • 11: On the Amendment: Lee Amendment (#928) to H.R. 1327Yea

    Key Vote 11: On the Amendment: Lee Amendment (#928) to H.R. 1327

    The Lee amendment would authorize $10.18 billion for the VCF over the next ten years (through 2029), which is the amount that the Congressional Budget Office has estimated is necessary for that time period. From 2030 through 2092, the Lee amendment would authorize another $10 billion for claims. This simple appropriation of funds would prevent the bill from, as written currently, giving a government program a completely blank check from Congress.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 12: On the Amendment: Paul Amendment (#929) to H.R. 1327Yea

    Key Vote 12: On the Amendment: Paul Amendment (#929) to H.R. 1327

    The Paul amendment would further the fiscal responsibility in the Lee amendment by requiring that the reauthorization of the VCF does not add new debt. “Any new spending that we are approaching, any new program that's going to have the longevity of 70, 80 years, should be offset by cutting spending that's less valuable," Sen. Paul said on the Senate floor.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 13: On the Amendment: Paul Amendment (#932) to H.R. 3877Yea

    Key Vote 13: On the Amendment: Paul Amendment (#932) to H.R. 3877

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 14: On Passage of the Bill: Bipartisan Budget Act of 2019, H.R. 3877Nay

    Key Vote 14: On Passage of the Bill: Bipartisan Budget Act of 2019, H.R. 3877

    The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2019 will increase the discretionary spending caps by more $320 billion over two fiscal years and suspend the debt limit through July 31, 2021.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 15: On the Amendment: Paul Amendment (#942) to H.R. 4378Yea

    Key Vote 15: On the Amendment: Paul Amendment (#942) to H.R. 4378

    This amendment, offered Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), would reduce spending authorized by the continuing resolution by 2 percent.

    "Yea" votes scored. Double Score
  • 16: On Passage: Continuing Appropriations Act, 2020 - H.R. 4378 Nay

    Key Vote 16: On Passage: Continuing Appropriations Act, 2020 - H.R. 4378

    The Continuing Appropriations Act, H.R. 4378, would fund the federal government through November 21, 2019. The continued practice of governance by CR merely sets up another showdown where Congress will be pushed into enacting a massive last-second spending binge before they can go home for the holidays. It will continue spending at near-record deficit levels, while simultaneously including a host of program reauthorizations that ought to have been considered, and potentially amended, on their own. This spending continues at a level that will shortly lead us back to trillion-dollar annual deficits, while the national debt limit remains suspended through 2021, granting the federal government a blank check to tax future generations through spending money it does not possess.

    "Nay" votes scored. Double Score
  • 17: On the Nomination: Eugene Scalia for Secretary of LaborYea

    Key Vote 17: On the Nomination: Eugene Scalia for Secretary of Labor

    Scalia is clearly a knowledgeable and highly qualified pick, having previously been appointed as the Department of Labor’s solicitor under President George W. Bush. He has since enjoyed a successful career as a lawyer on labor and employment issues. During his legal career, Scalia has been successful in pushing back against federal overreaches into workplace regulation. Such a voice at the Department of Labor will be valuable in ensuring that its mission to protect workers does not further spill over into unnecessary, job-killing red tape.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 18: On the Amendment: Paul Amendment (#1019) to H.R. 3055Yea

    Key Vote 18: On the Amendment: Paul Amendment (#1019) to H.R. 3055

    This amendment, offered Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), would reduce the appropriations authorized under H.R. 3055 by 2 percent. H.R. 3055 included the Senate’s versions of the Commerce, Justice, and Science; Agriculture, Rural Development, and Food and Drug Administration; Interior and Environment; and Transportation and Urban Development appropriations bills for FY 2020

    "Yea" votes scored. Double Score
  • 19: On Passage: State Innovation Waivers CRA - S.J.Res. 52Nay

    Key Vote 19: On Passage: State Innovation Waivers CRA - S.J.Res. 52

    Introduced by Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.), S.J.Res. 52 targets guidance issued by the Department of the Treasury and the Department of Health and Human Services that made it easier for states to get “state innovation waivers” under Section 1332 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The Trump administration has taken regulatory steps to provide more affordable private health insurance options through association health plans and short-term, limited-duration plans. In October 2018, the Department of the Treasury, the Department of Health and Human Services, and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services issued guidance that further eases the process of applying for and receiving a waiver. The October 2018 guidance focuses on the coverage that is made available on the exchanges by health insurance companies rather than what consumers had purchased. States must still meet statutory requirements to be eligible for a waiver, but the guidance explains that the comprehensiveness and affordability requirement may be considered met “if access to coverage that is as affordable and comprehensive as coverage forecasted to have been available in the absence of the waiver is projected to be available to a comparable number of people under the waiver.” If an individual decides to purchase a more affordable, less comprehensive plan, the comprehensiveness and affordability requirement under Section 1332 will be met because there will be more comprehensive offerings on the exchanged that they could have opted to purchase. The guidance issued by the Department of the Treasury and the Department of Health and Human Services is not a cure-all for the issues that America’s health insurance system faces. Much more has to be done to address these issues, particularly through the legislative process. Unfortunately, congressional Democrats aren’t interested in solutions; many want more government involvement and the elimination of private health insurance.

    "Nay" votes scored.
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