Jody Hice

Jody Hice

  • R-GA, 10th District2015 – present
Jody Hice's photo

Score (Avg: 97%)

YearScore
2015100%
2016100%
201793%

Key Voting Record

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Key Vote Description

Legislator Score / Vote

2017: 115th Congress 93%

  • 1: On Passage: REINS Act - H.R. 26Yea

    Key Vote 1: On Passage: REINS Act - H.R. 26

    Introduced by Rep. Doug Collins (R-Ga.), the Regulations from the Executive in Need of Scrutiny (REINS) Act requires congressional approval for economically significant rules promulgated by federal regulatory agencies. Rules defined as economically significant have an annual impact of $100 million or more. The Obama administration finalized more than 600 economically significant rules in less than eight years. The REINS Act brings a crucial check on executive power, reduces the influence of federal regulatory agencies, and begins to reclaim Congress’ constitutional power as the sole lawmaking authority under the Constitution.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 2: On Passage: Regulatory Accountability Act - H.R. 5Yea

    Key Vote 2: On Passage: Regulatory Accountability Act - H.R. 5

    Introduced by Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.), the Regulatory Accountability Act seeks to reform the regulatory process, making it more transparent for the American people and more accountable to Congress. It also includes language to reverse the Chevron deference, which has been used by regulatory agencies to enact law without judicial review.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 3: On Passage: H.J. Res 41 - Resolution of Disapproval Against the SEC's Disclosure of Payments by Resource Extraction Issuers RuleYea

    Key Vote 3: On Passage: H.J. Res 41 - Resolution of Disapproval Against the SEC's Disclosure of Payments by Resource Extraction Issuers Rule

    This resolution of disapproval of the Congressional Review Act nullifies the Securities and Exchange Commission's Disclosure of Payments by Resource Extraction Issuers rule. Promulgated under the authority of the Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, or Dodd-Frank, this rule requires resource extraction issuers to include in annual reports the payment of any entity controlled by the regulated business to foreign governments or the United States government "for the purpose of the commercial development of oil, natural gas, or minerals." The Securities and Exchange Commission projects initial compliance costs between $239 million and $700 million and annual compliance costs between $96 million and $591 million.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 4: On Passage: H.J.Res. 38 - Resolution of Disapproval Against the Department of the Interior's Stream Protection RuleYea

    Key Vote 4: On Passage: H.J.Res. 38 - Resolution of Disapproval Against the Department of the Interior's Stream Protection Rule

    This resolution of disapproval of the Congressional Review Act nullifies the Department of the Interior's Stream Protection Rule. With an annual estimated cost of $81 million, according to the Department of the Interior's Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, the Stream Protection Rule is another blow to the coal industry, which was a favorite target of the Obama administration. The National Mining Association estimates that rule will lead to billions of dollars in lost revenues to state and local governments, as well as the loss of between 113,000 and 280,000 jobs.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 5: On Passage: H.J. Res. 37 - Resolution of Disapproval Against the DOD, GSA, and NASA Federal Acquisition RegulationYea

    Key Vote 5: On Passage: H.J. Res. 37 - Resolution of Disapproval Against the DOD, GSA, and NASA Federal Acquisition Regulation

    This resolution of disapproval under the Congressional Review Act nullifies a the Department of Defense, the General Services Administration, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's relating to the Federal Acquisition Regulation. This regulation requires federal contractors to disclose decisions on the reporting of violations of federal labor laws and creates paycheck transparency protections for employees of federal contractors. The rule is expected to cost employers $458.3 million in the first year, $413.7 million in the second year, and between $398.5 million and $400 million annually thereafter.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 6: On Passage: H.J.Res. 36 - Resolution of Disapproval Against the Bureau of Land Management’s Prevention, Production Subject to Royalties, and Resource Conservation RuleYea

    Key Vote 6: On Passage: H.J.Res. 36 - Resolution of Disapproval Against the Bureau of Land Management’s Prevention, Production Subject to Royalties, and Resource Conservation Rule

    This resolution of disapproval of the Congressional Review Act nullifies Bureau of Land Management’s Prevention, Production Subject to Royalties, and Resource Conservation Rule. With annual compliance costs between $114 million and $279 million, the so-called “venting and flaring” rule purports to reduce waste from “reduce the waste of natural gas from mineral leases administered” by the Bureau of Land Management. In reality, the purpose of the rule is to discourage oil and gas production on land overseen by the agency. The Bureau of Land Management estimates annual compliance costs between $114 million and $279 million.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 7: On Passage: H.J.Res. 57 - Resolution of Disapproval Against the Department of Education's Accountability and State Plans RuleYea

    Key Vote 7: On Passage: H.J.Res. 57 - Resolution of Disapproval Against the Department of Education's Accountability and State Plans Rule

    This resolution of disapproval under the Congressional Review Act, which gives Congress authority to effectively nullify regulations submitted for review by federal agencies within 60 legislative days, would cancel the Department of Education’s Accountability and State Plans Rule. The Department of Education’s Accountability and State Plans Rule implements part of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and leaves open a loophole that federal bureaucrats could exploit to force Common Core on states that haven't implemented the standards. Education officials from several states and local jurisdictions strongly opposed the rule when it was being crafted.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 8: On Passage: H.R. 372 - Competitive Health Insurance Reform ActYea

    Key Vote 8: On Passage: H.R. 372 - Competitive Health Insurance Reform Act

    Introduced by Rep. Paul Gosar (R-Ariz.), the Competitive Health Insurance Reform Act would eliminate the antitrust exemption the health insurance industry currently has under the McCarran-Ferguson Act of 1945. One of the main problems with the health care system today is the protections put in place by the federal government that cater to special interest groups. The Competitive Health Insurance Reform Act promotes the free market and competition by changing a law put in place nearly 70 years ago to reflect the current market we have today. It would also ensure that the health insurance industry complies with the same laws other businesses do.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 9: On Passage: H.R. 1101 - Small Business Health Fairness ActYea

    Key Vote 9: On Passage: H.R. 1101 - Small Business Health Fairness Act

    ObamaCare has caused the cost of health insurance coverage to rise, making it difficult for small businesses to continue offering health insurance coverage to employees. The Small Business Health Fairness Act would help level the playing field for small businesses, which don’t have the negotiating power of larger firms and exemptions under Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), and lower administrative costs related to health insurance.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 10: On Passage: Consolidated Appropriations Act - H.R. 244Nay

    Key Vote 10: On Passage: Consolidated Appropriations Act - H.R. 244

    The process for the Consolidated Appropriations Act, which funds the federal government for the remainder of FY 2017, could not have been worse. This massive, nearly 1,700-page spending measure was negotiated behind closed doors between congressional leadership from both chambers and appropriators. With a Republican-controlled Congress and a Republican president, this spending bill reflects Obama-era spending levels. The bill annualizes base discretionary spending for FY 2017 at $1.07 trillion. This spending level blows through the spending caps established by the Budget Control Act of 2011 by $30 billion. The bill spends an additional $106 billion for overseas contingency operations, disaster relief, and other spending, which isn’t counted toward the spending caps. In total, the bill authorizes more than $1.175 trillion in annualized discretionary spending for FY 2017. The bill also falls short of promoting conservative priorities. While the bill does renew the D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program and does not include funding for ObamaCare’s cost-sharing subsidies, it allocates nearly $296 million to bail out Puerto Rico’s Medicaid program, preserves current spending levels for the Environmental Protection Agency, increases spending for the National Institutes of Health and the National Endowment for the Arts, and provides a bailout for a private sector labor union.

    "Nay" votes scored. Double Score
  • 11: On Passage: Probation Officer Protection Act - H.R. 1039Yea

    Key Vote 11: On Passage: Probation Officer Protection Act - H.R. 1039

    While there is a need to protect law enforcement officers who are performing their duties, the Probation Officer Protection Act is an answer in search of a problem. Interference with a federal probation officer is already unlawful and current law already allows a law enforcement officer to arrest an individual or individuals who obstruct a federal probation officer during the performance of their duties. The instances in which third parties obstruct a federal probation officer are rare. While probationers have lost some of their Fourth Amendment rights, third parties have not. The Probation Officer Protection Act could lead to instances in which the Fourth Amendments rights of third parties are infringed because of overly broad language in Section 2(b) or interpretations of words in it, such as “intimidation” or “interference.” Additionally, the “rules and regulations” under which the arrest authority of federal probation officers will be determined by the Administrative Office of the United States Courts, not by Congress. This creates yet another situation in which Congress is relenting its constitutional authority to another branch of the federal government.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 12: On Passage: Financial CHOICE Act - H.R. 10Yea

    Key Vote 12: On Passage: Financial CHOICE Act - H.R. 10

    The Financial CHOICE Act would eliminate the job-killing regulations that Dodd-Frank has instituted, rein in the CFPB, increase penalties for financial institutions who engage in illicit practices, and provide other reforms necessary to address the issues that earlier “well intentioned” legislation instituted. While we are disappointed and frustrated that language in the bill that would have repealed the Durbin amendment was removed by the House Rules Committee, if passed, the Financial CHOICE Act will open up the market in the financial sector that would help create jobs and invite new businesses. This will drive compliance costs down, increase the number of banks that will be created, and provide the necessary oversight to the federal government.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 13: On Agreeing to the Amendment: McClintock Amendment to H.R. 2810Nay

    Key Vote 13: On Agreeing to the Amendment: McClintock Amendment to H.R. 2810

    Sponsored by Rep. Tom McClintock (R-Calif,), the amendment would strike the proposed prohibition against another round of Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC). A 2013 report by the conservative American Enterprise Institute (AEI) estimated that the first four rounds of BRAC save approximately $8 billion annually. The 2005 BRAC is saving nearly $4 billion annually.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 14: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Gosar Amendment to H.R. 2810Yea

    Key Vote 14: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Gosar Amendment to H.R. 2810

    Sponsored by Rep. Paul Gosar (R-Ariz.), the amendment would require that Secretary of Labor conduct determinations for the prevailing wage for defense-related construction projects. Currently, the Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division uses survey data that is unreliable and inflates the prevailing wage. The amendment would lower the cost of defense-related construction projects, saving taxpayers money.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 15: On Passage: H.J.Res. 111 - Resolution of Disapproval Against the CFPB's Arbitration RuleYea

    Key Vote 15: On Passage: H.J.Res. 111 - Resolution of Disapproval Against the CFPB's Arbitration Rule

    This resolution of disapproval under the Congressional Review Act (CRA) would cancel the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) arbitration rule. The CFPB’s arbitration rule is a giveaway to trial lawyers. The rule ostensibly bans contractual arbitration clauses related to consumer financial products offered by banks and other financial sector firms. This severely limits consumers’ ability to enter into arbitration during disputes. Trbitration is an easier and quicker process for consumers to resolve issues, but lawyers don’t make much money from this process. The rule, however, will encourage trial lawyers to pursue more class-action lawsuits, which take longer and result in smaller payouts to consumers.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 16: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Griffith Amendment to H.R. 3219Yea

    Key Vote 16: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Griffith Amendment to H.R. 3219

    Sponsored by Rep. Morgan Griffith (R-Va.), this amendment would eliminate the CBO’s Budget Analysis Division. The amendment transfers the authority of the division to the Director of the CBO.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 17: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Blackburn Amendment to H.R. 3219Yea

    Key Vote 17: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Blackburn Amendment to H.R. 3219

    Sponsored by Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.), this amendment would make a 1 percent across the board rescission to Division D of H.R. 3219 – the Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 18: Signers on the Discharge Petition for H.Res. 458 - 2015-Style ObamaCare RepealYea

    Key Vote 18: Signers on the Discharge Petition for H.Res. 458 - 2015-Style ObamaCare Repeal

    For the better part of a decade, congressional Republicans pledged to repeal ObamaCare. Between 2011 and 2015, the House passed legislation to fully repeal ObamaCare on four separate occasions before eventually using reconciliation for partial repeal. Roughly 18 months ago, the House passed the Restoring Americans' Healthcare Freedom Reconciliation Act, H.R. 3762, with only three Republican defections. The bill repealed as much of ObamaCare as possible under the rules of reconciliation, including the tax and cost sharing subsidies, Medicaid expansion, and the taxes that came with the law. The bill would have reduced the federal budget deficit by $516 billion over ten years. House Republicans must continue to work diligently to repeal ObamaCare. With the American health insurance system facing so many problems because of ObamaCare – among which are skyrocketing premiums and fewer choices in the non-group market – Republicans can’t give up. A discharge petition is a legislative tool that requires the signatures of 218 members of the House to immediately bring a bill to the floor for a vote.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 19: On Agreeing to the Amendment: McClintock Amendment to H.R. 3354Yea

    Key Vote 19: On Agreeing to the Amendment: McClintock Amendment to H.R. 3354

    Sponsored by Rep. Tom McClintock (R-Calif.), this amendment would reduce funding for the Essential Air Service program by $150 million and transfer the savings to the Spending Reduction Account. The Essential Air Service subsidizes flights to small communities in the United States and its territories. These flights, however, are often half full or mostly empty, within driving distance, and heavily subsidized.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 20: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Budd Amendment to H.R. 3354Yea

    Key Vote 20: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Budd Amendment to H.R. 3354

    Sponsored by Rep. Ted Budd (R-N.C.), this amendment would eliminate a planned $900 million earmark for an upgrade of an Amtrak rail line between Newark, New Jersey and New York City. Supposedly, the House has a moratorium on earmarks. Yet, this would be one of the largest ever included in an appropriations package. This amendment would redirect $474 million to deficit reduction and $400 million to New Starts Account.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 21: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Brooks Amendment to H.R. 3354Yea

    Key Vote 21: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Brooks Amendment to H.R. 3354

    Sponsored by Rep. Mo Brooks (R-Ala.), this amendment would defund Amtrak, a federally funded passenger railroad service. Amtrak routinely loses money, failing to cover its operating costs through fares paid by passengers. This amendment would save $1.1 billion.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 22: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Biggs Amendment to H.R. 3354Yea

    Key Vote 22: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Biggs Amendment to H.R. 3354

    Sponsored by Rep. Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.), this amendment would cut funding for the Environmental Protection Administration’s (EPA) Environmental Programs and Management Account by $10.234 million and redirect the savings to the EPA’s Spending Reduction Account.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 23: On Motion to Concur to the Senate Amendment to H.R. 601 - To Increase the Debt LimitNay

    Key Vote 23: On Motion to Concur to the Senate Amendment to H.R. 601 - To Increase the Debt Limit

    As amended by the Senate, H.R. 601 would increase the debt limit and fund the federal government through December 8 without any spending or regulatory reforms. There are no guarantees that the situation will be any different when Congress revisits the issue in December. We have reached a critical point. At a time when grassroots conservative engagement is essential to pass priorities like fundamental tax reform, the administration and a Republican-controlled Congress are playing right into the hands of leftists like Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi. A debt limit increase without any spending or regulatory reforms would only further anger grassroots conservatives, risking their support for other priorities.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 24: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Blackburn Amendment to Division A of H.R. 3354Yea

    Key Vote 24: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Blackburn Amendment to Division A of H.R. 3354

    Sponsored by Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.), this amendment would make a 1 percent across the board rescission to Division A, which authorizes appropriations for Department of the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 25: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Norman Amendment to H.R. 3354Yea

    Key Vote 25: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Norman Amendment to H.R. 3354

    Sponsored by Rep. Ralph Norman (R-S.C.), this amendment would reduce the appropriation to the EPA for FY 2018 by $1.869 billion.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 26: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Grothman Amendment to H.R. 3354Yea

    Key Vote 26: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Grothman Amendment to H.R. 3354

    Sponsored by Rep. Glenn Grothman (R-Wis.), this amendment would reduce the funding for the National Labor Relations Board (NRLB) by $99 million and transfer the savings to the Spending Reduction Account.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 27: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Blackburn Amendment to Division F of H.R. 3354Yea

    Key Vote 27: On Agreeing to the Amendment: Blackburn Amendment to Division F of H.R. 3354

    Sponsored by Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.), this amendment would make a 1 percent across the board rescission to Division F, which authorizes appropriations for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and Related Agencies.

    "Yea" votes scored.
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