Thad Cochran

Thad Cochran

  • R-MS, Senator1978 – present
  • R-MS, 4th District1977 – 1978
  • R-MS, 4th District1973 – 1976
Thad Cochran's photo

Lifetime Score 56%

73%
‘05
2005: 73%
50%
2006: 50%
50%
2007: 50%
43%
2008: 43%
62%
2009: 62%
83%
2010: 83%
61%
2011: 61%
46%
2012: 46%
41%
2013: 41%
50%
2014: 50%
33%
2015: 33%
45%
2016: 45%
69%
‘17
2017: 69%

Contact Information

Key Voting Record

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Key Vote Description

Legislator Score / Vote

2018: 115th Congress N/A

Sen. Cochran has not been scored for 2018 because he resigned on April 1.

  • 1: On the Cloture Motion: FISA Amendments Reauthorization Act - S. 139Yea

    Key Vote 1: On the Cloture Motion: FISA Amendments Reauthorization Act - S. 139

    This vote is on the motion to invoke cloture on the FISA Amendments Reauthorization Act, S. 139, which requires a 60-vote majority to limit debate. In addition to the objections FreedomWorks has to the bill, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) used a tactic known as "filling the tree" to prevent amendments that would have addressed the concerns of constitutional conservatives and libertarians.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 2: On the Motion: FISA Amendments Reauthorization Act - S. 139Yea

    Key Vote 2: On the Motion: FISA Amendments Reauthorization Act - S. 139

    Despite some tweaks to the original text produced by the House Select Committee on Intelligence, the FISA Amendments Reauthorization Act continues to represent an assault on the Fourth Amendment. The Bill of Rights is a cornerstone of our constitutional republic, and crucial to defending the civil liberties of all American citizens. FISA has caused damage to the Fourth Amendment for years, and now is a critical time to support genuine reform, such as the USA RIGHTS Act. The revised version of the FISA Amendments Reauthorization Act remains the exact opposite of reform, and it is worse than current law. The bill would continue the backdoor search, with an utterly meaningless “warrant requirement.” The caveats proposed to this purported “warrant requirement” are an end-run around the Fourth Amendment. The bill provides a path for the National Security Agency (NSA) to restart the practice of “abouts” collection. This means if a U.S. person mentions a potential surveillance target in a communication, the NSA can collect it, regardless of whether or not the U.S. person was communicating with anyone associated with the target.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 3: On the Cloture Motion: Bipartisan Budget ActYea

    Key Vote 3: On the Cloture Motion: Bipartisan Budget Act

    This vote is for cloture on the Bipartisan Budget Act. Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) had offered an amendment to restore the original spending caps under the Budget Control Act. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) "filled the tree," refusing to allow amendments. A vote for cloture is essentially a vote not to allow amendments.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 4: On the Motion: Bipartisan Budget ActYea

    Key Vote 4: On the Motion: Bipartisan Budget Act

    The Schumer-McConnell spending deal, the Bipartisan Budget Act, is the worst-case scenario for fiscal conservatives under a Democratic president and Democrat-controlled Congress, but it is happening under a Republican president and Republican Congress. This is reckless spending, and a massive tax hike on future generations, made under the guise of “bipartisan negotiations.” This is deceitful, aggressive overspending by those elected to protect taxpayers. Leaving Americans with higher budget deficits likely over $1 trillion, and a national debt that will balloon to over $21 trillion, is no way to govern, and its weight falls squarely on the shoulders of taxpayers. This deal makes clear that Republicans only care about deficits and out-of-control federal spending under a Democratic president. With a Republican president and Republican control of the House and Senate, there is no other conclusion that one can possibly draw.

    "Nay" votes scored. Triple Score
  • 5: On the Nomination: Russ Vought to Serve as Deputy Director of the Office of Management and BudgetYea

    Key Vote 5: On the Nomination: Russ Vought to Serve as Deputy Director of the Office of Management and Budget

    Russ Vought's nomination had been stalled by Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas), who sought to leverage his obstruction of the nomination in exchange for more emergency supplemental funding for his home state. Vought's credentials to serve in this important post, which handles budget and regulatory policy for the White House, were never in question. Democrats opposed Vought's nomination over issues that have nothing to do with his ability to serve as deputy director of the Office of Management and Budget.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 6: On Passage of the Bill: Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act, S. 2155Yea

    Key Vote 6: On Passage of the Bill: Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act, S. 2155

    Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act would provide targeted relief in the banking industry from onerous regulatory overreach into the financial sector created by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, commonly known as “Dodd-Frank.” Initially passed in response to the recession of 2008, Dodd-Frank created a series of reforms that were supposed to address the issues in the financial sector that had supposedly caused the recession, but instead created a climate of overregulation, authorized the creation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) with little to no oversight, and gave the Financial Stability Oversight Council (FSOC) the authority to label financial firms as too big to fail.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 7: Co-Sponsors of the Federal Reserve Transparency Act, S. 16Nay

    Key Vote 7: Co-Sponsors of the Federal Reserve Transparency Act, S. 16

    The Federal Reserve Transparency Act instructs the Comptroller General of the United States, who serves as the director of the Government Accountability Office (GAO) to complete an audit of the Federal Reserve within 12 months of its enactment. A report of the findings of the audit would be required within 90 days of its completion. The bill would require the Federal Reserve to provide information to the GAO, currently excluded from audits under 31 USC 714(b), including discussions between the Federal Reserve and the Treasury Department, as well as transactions with foreign banks. Should Leader McConnell bring this bill to the floor, FreedomWorks will substitute the cosponsor key vote for the roll call vote.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 8: Co-Sponsors of the CREATES Act, S. 974Nay

    Key Vote 8: Co-Sponsors of the CREATES Act, S. 974

    The CREATES Act would grant relief in court for generic and biosimilar competitors seeking FDA approval. This would clear the pathway for new drugs to enter the market, drastically reducing prices through increased competition. The cost savings stemming from this legislation could reach between 15 percent and 50 percent of current prices for impacted drugs. Should Leader McConnell bring this bill to the floor, FreedomWorks will substitute the cosponsor key vote for the roll call vote. Should Leader McConnell bring this bill to the floor, FreedomWorks will substitute the cosponsor key vote for the roll call vote.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 9: Co-Sponsors of the Regulations from the Executive in Need of Scrutiny (REINS) Act, S. 21Nay

    Key Vote 9: Co-Sponsors of the Regulations from the Executive in Need of Scrutiny (REINS) Act, S. 21

    The REINS Act would require congressional approval for economically significant rules promulgated by federal regulatory agencies. Under the REINS Act, the House and Senate would have to vote on a proposed rule and the president would have to sign it before enforcement of the rule can begin. The bill would give Congress 70 days to pass a resolution to approve a rule. If a resolution is not passed, the rule cannot take effect. Should Leader McConnell bring this bill to the floor, FreedomWorks will substitute the cosponsor key vote for the roll call vote.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 10: Co-Sponsors of the Earmark Elimination Act, S. 2330Nay

    Key Vote 10: Co-Sponsors of the Earmark Elimination Act, S. 2330

    The Earmark Elimination Act would make permanent the temporary moratorium on congressional earmarks put into effect in 2010 by creating a point of order against any provision within a bill that matches the definition of an earmark, and when raised would be stricken absent a two-thirds majority to override. Should Leader McConnell bring this bill to the floor, FreedomWorks will substitute the cosponsor key vote for the roll call vote.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 11: Co-Sponsors of the CBO Show Your Work Act, S. 1746Nay

    Key Vote 11: Co-Sponsors of the CBO Show Your Work Act, S. 1746

    The CBO Show Your Work Act would require the Congressional Budget Office to make the models and data employed to produce its analyses and cost estimates, as well as any details that were used, available to Congress and on the agency’s website. This much-needed transparency will allow interested parties outside of Congress to hold the CBO accountable. Should Leader McConnell bring this bill to the floor, FreedomWorks will substitute the cosponsor key vote for the roll call vote.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 12: On the Motion: Consolidated Appropriations Act, H.R. 1625Yea

    Key Vote 12: On the Motion: Consolidated Appropriations Act, H.R. 1625

    Altogether, the bill spends nearly $1.3 trillion in discretionary funds – $700 billion for defense, and $591 billion for non-defense – for fiscal year 2018 alone. These appropriations would bring us back to Obama-era trillion-dollar yearly deficits, and balloon our national debt to nearly $22 trillion. This level of spending for a unified Republican government is unacceptable and breaks the promises of every Republican member who ran on a platform of defending taxpayers, spending responsibly, and reigning in the size of government.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 27: On the Nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh to the Supreme CourtIneligible

    Key Vote 27: On the Nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court

    When it comes more broadly to the rampant expansion of the unconstitutional regulatory state, Judge Kavanaugh is perhaps second to none in standing up for the Constitution. According to Kavanaugh, if Congress hasn’t yet opined on a matter of deep economic significance, any regulation relating to that matter should be presumed unconstitutional. He recognizes that lawmaking, under Article I of the Constitution, was delegated to Congress, not unelected executive branch bureaucrats.

    "Yea" votes scored. Double Score
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