Frank R. Lautenberg

Frank R. Lautenberg

  • D-NJ, Senator1982 – 2013
Frank R. Lautenberg's photo

Lifetime Score 8%

0%
‘05
2005: 0%
8%
2006: 8%
8%
2007: 8%
0%
2008: 0%
15%
2009: 15%
0%
2010: 0%
22%
2011: 22%
8%
2012: 8%
13%
‘13
2013: 13%

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Key Voting Record

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Key Vote Description

Legislator Score / Vote

2013: 113th Congress N/A

Senator Lautenberg has not ben scored for 2013 because he died in May.

  • 1: S.Res. 15 - Amending the Rules of the SenateYea

    Key Vote 1: S.Res. 15 - Amending the Rules of the Senate

    This change to the rules of the Senate weakens the minority party's ability to filibuster legislation by imposing much tighter restrictions on debate time on bills. The ability of either party to slow down consideration of a bill or nomination was a feature granted to the Senate intentionally by our founders, providing the opportunity for legislation to be exhaustively debated before being passed into law. This rules change is a major blow to that important tradition.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 2: S.Amdt. 4 to H.R. 152 - To reduce annually appropriated spending by .49% across the board.Nay

    Key Vote 2: S.Amdt. 4 to H.R. 152 - To reduce annually appropriated spending by .49% across the board.

    This amendment, sponsored by Senator Mike Lee (UT), would offset the cost of the emergency spending in the Disaster Relief Act over time by making a .49% across-the board cut to discretionary spending. Such a minor spending cut in order to offset a large amount of deficit spending should be an easy call given the current $16.4 trillion national debt.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 3: H.R. 152 - Disaster Relief Appropriations ActYea

    Key Vote 3: H.R. 152 - Disaster Relief Appropriations Act

    This bill is an "emergency" appropriations bill that contains $50.1 billion in spending that is supposed to aid those affected by Hurricane Sandy. In reality, however, most of the spending will not provide acute disaster relief, and much of it is not even scheduled to be spent until 2014 or later. Thus, the bill functions more like a stimulus than true disaster relief and its spending should be appropriated through the budget process instead of as emergency spending that adds to the federal deficit.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 4: On the Motion to Table: S.Amdt. 8 - To require that the U.S. gov't prioritize certain payments when the debt limit is reachedYea

    Key Vote 4: On the Motion to Table: S.Amdt. 8 - To require that the U.S. gov't prioritize certain payments when the debt limit is reached

    This amendment would require that, upon reaching the debt limit, the Treasury would prioritize military pay, Social Security obligations, and payments of interest on the national debt. This would prevent the executive branch from making the claim that reaching the debt ceiling would prevent Social Security checks from being sent, since the government incurs enough revenue to meet these obligations without borrowing.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 5: H.R. 325 - To Increase the Debt Limit until May 19th, 2013Yea

    Key Vote 5: H.R. 325 - To Increase the Debt Limit until May 19th, 2013

    This bill raises the statutory limit on the public debt (the "debt ceiling") by whatever amount is necessary to reach May 19th, 2013. Although the bill theoretically contains a "no budget, no pay" provision conditional upon the Senate passing a budget resolution, in reality the provision has no teeth. FreedomWorks insists that further increases in the debt ceiling by accompanied by proportional decreases in federal spending in order to address the ever-increasing federal debt, which at the time of this bill stood at $16.4 trillion. Instead, this bill amounts to a "clean" debt ceiling hike, accompanied by the unenforceable promise of spending reforms at a later date.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 6: S.Amdt. 30 to S.Amdt. 26 to H.R. 933 - To Defund ObamaCareDid Not Vote

    Key Vote 6: S.Amdt. 30 to S.Amdt. 26 to H.R. 933 - To Defund ObamaCare

    This amendment would effectively defund ObamaCare by tying its funding to economic growth reaching historical average levels. Defunding ObamaCare would reduce ten-year spending by over $1 trillion and would go a long way towards reducing our government's massive annual deficits.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 7: H.R. 933 - Continuing Resolution/Minibus AppropriationsDid Not Vote

    Key Vote 7: H.R. 933 - Continuing Resolution/Minibus Appropriations

    This is the amended version of the bill containing the Continuing Resolution to fund the federal government through the end of the fiscal year. The bill still funds ObamaCare, and continues to institutionalize current levels of deficit spending. In addition, the House and Senate each added several departmental appropriation bills into the C.R., bypassing regular order and the amendment process that ought to accompany each of these spending bills individually.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 8: S.Amdt. 656 to S.Amdt. 578 to S.Con.Res. 8 - Allowing states to enforce an internet sales tax (Marketplace Fairness Act)Did Not Vote

    Key Vote 8: S.Amdt. 656 to S.Amdt. 578 to S.Con.Res. 8 - Allowing states to enforce an internet sales tax (Marketplace Fairness Act)

    This budget amendment was a proxy vote for the Marketplace Fairness Act, which would allow states to band together to collect taxes on internet sales from citizens of other states. This type of internet sales tax scheme violates the physical presence standard of tax collection and would place an undue compliance burden upon online retailers.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 9: S.Amdt. 515 to S.Con.Res. 8 - School ChoiceDid Not Vote

    Key Vote 9: S.Amdt. 515 to S.Con.Res. 8 - School Choice

    This amendment would make federal education dollars under No Child Left Behind portable so that lower-income parents could use that money towards sending their child to another school. This would be a good first step towards offering parents true choice in their children's education.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 10: S.Amdt 307 to S.Con.Res. 8 - To Eliminate the Estate TaxDid Not Vote

    Key Vote 10: S.Amdt 307 to S.Con.Res. 8 - To Eliminate the Estate Tax

    This amendment to the Senate's budget resolution would call for the outright elimination of the estate tax (better known as the "death tax"). The death tax is absolutely unjust because it taxes assets that have already been taxed before, and it punishes those who have saved their money over a lifetime to pass on to the next generation. This tax is particularly devastating to small businesses and family farms.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 11: S.Amdt. 263 to S.Con.Res. 8 - Rand Paul's BudgetDid Not Vote

    Key Vote 11: S.Amdt. 263 to S.Con.Res. 8 - Rand Paul's Budget

    This is Senator Rand Paul's budget plan, which would balance in five years, eliminate four Cabinet departments, replace the current tax code with a flat tax, and fundamentally reform all major entitlement programs.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 12: S.Amdt. 597 to S.Con.Res. 8 - Paycheck Protection for Federal EmployeesDid Not Vote

    Key Vote 12: S.Amdt. 597 to S.Con.Res. 8 - Paycheck Protection for Federal Employees

    This amendment would prevent taxpayer resources from being used to automatically deduct union dues from the paychecks of unionized federal employees. Federal workers, most of whom have never had the opportunity to vote on whether or not they wish to be unionized, ought to be able to decide if they wish to pay dues to their unions. Much of the collected dues are used for union political activities, which a given employee may or may not agree with.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 13: S.Con.Res. 8 - Setting forth the congressional budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2014Did Not Vote

    Key Vote 13: S.Con.Res. 8 - Setting forth the congressional budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2014

    This is the Senate Democrats' budget plan, which raises taxes by nearly $1 trillion while using budget gimmicks to claim $1.8 trillion in spending cuts. In reality, the budget never achieves balance and actually increases spending in the first year, while failing to address the primary drivers of government spending - entitlements - at all.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 14: S. 743 - The Marketplace Fairness Act (Internet Sales Tax)Did Not Vote

    Key Vote 14: S. 743 - The Marketplace Fairness Act (Internet Sales Tax)

    This bill allows states to collect taxes on internet sales from businesses in other states. This violates the physical presence standard that has governed tax collection since our founding, and raises constitutional issues about businesses being forced to bear the expense of complying with tax collection for states in which they have no representation.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 15: On Cloture: S. 954 - The Farm BillNay

    Key Vote 15: On Cloture: S. 954 - The Farm Bill

    The so-called "Farm Bill" is actually a combination of agricultural policy and welfare, with food stamps accounting for 80 percent of the bill's nearly trillion dollars in projected spending. Aside from failing to contain the multitude of faults within the rapidly-expanding food welfare programs, the agricultural portion of the bill is an amalgam of direct corporate welfare for insurance companies and farm corporations and special carve-outs and price supports for the specific industries with the best lobbyists.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 17: Lee Letter to Defund ObamaCare through the Continuing ResolutionIneligible

    Key Vote 17: Lee Letter to Defund ObamaCare through the Continuing Resolution

    Senator Mike Lee solicited signers on a letter to Senator Harry Reid, which declared that the signers would not vote for any appropriations bill, including a Continuing Resolution (CR), that contained further funding for ObamaCare's implementation or enforcement. The letter put senators on the record committing to actually defunding ObamaCare using a must-pass bill (the CR), rather than just taking another symbolic vote on an amendment that the Democrats could easily defeat.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 19: On Cloture: H.R. 2775 - Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014 Nay

    Key Vote 19: On Cloture: H.R. 2775 - Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014

    H.R. 2775 was used as the vehicle for the Continuing Resolution (CR) to fund the federal government. This bill funds the government fully (including ObamaCare) through January 15th of 2014, suspends the debt ceiling until February of 2014, and obliges both chambers of Congress to go to conference on a full-year budget. In other words, this CR allows for more uncontrolled spending and debt, with no reforms to either, does nothing to address ObamaCare, and potentially promises more future spending if a budget agreement is reached.

    "Nay" votes scored.
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