Cindy Hyde-Smith

Cindy Hyde-Smith

  • R-MS, Senator2018 – present
Cindy Hyde-Smith's photo

Lifetime Score 50%

50%
‘18
2018: 50%

Key Voting Record

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Key Vote Description

Legislator Score / Vote

2018: 115th Congress 50%

  • 7: Co-Sponsors of the CREATES Act, S. 974Nay

    Key Vote 7: Co-Sponsors of the CREATES Act, S. 974

    The CREATES Act would grant relief in court for generic and biosimilar competitors seeking FDA approval. This would clear the pathway for new drugs to enter the market, drastically reducing prices through increased competition. The cost savings stemming from this legislation could reach between 15 percent and 50 percent of current prices for impacted drugs. Should Leader McConnell bring this bill to the floor, FreedomWorks will substitute the cosponsor key vote for the roll call vote. Should Leader McConnell bring this bill to the floor, FreedomWorks will substitute the cosponsor key vote for the roll call vote.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 8: Co-Sponsors of the Regulations from the Executive in Need of Scrutiny (REINS) Act, S. 21Yea

    Key Vote 8: Co-Sponsors of the Regulations from the Executive in Need of Scrutiny (REINS) Act, S. 21

    The REINS Act would require congressional approval for economically significant rules promulgated by federal regulatory agencies. Under the REINS Act, the House and Senate would have to vote on a proposed rule and the president would have to sign it before enforcement of the rule can begin. The bill would give Congress 70 days to pass a resolution to approve a rule. If a resolution is not passed, the rule cannot take effect. Should Leader McConnell bring this bill to the floor, FreedomWorks will substitute the cosponsor key vote for the roll call vote.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 10: Co-Sponsors of the Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act, S. 1917Nay

    Key Vote 10: Co-Sponsors of the Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act, S. 1917

    SRCA would provide a a comprehensive solution to the myriad of problems marring the federal criminal justice system by offering a three-faceted approach: front-end sentencing reform, back-end corrections reform, and a commission created to study the criminal justice system. These reforms, proven effective at the state level to reducing recidivism, lowering crime, and saving taxpayer dollars can and should be applied to the federal justice system. Should Leader McConnell bring this bill to the floor, FreedomWorks will substitute the cosponsor key vote for the roll call vote.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 11: Co-Sponsor of the Earmark Elimination Act, S. 2330Nay

    Key Vote 11: Co-Sponsor of the Earmark Elimination Act, S. 2330

    The Earmark Elimination Act would make permanent the temporary moratorium on congressional earmarks put into effect in 2010 by creating a point of order against any provision within a bill that matches the definition of an earmark, and when raised would be stricken absent a two-thirds majority to override. Should Leader McConnell bring this bill to the floor, FreedomWorks will substitute the cosponsor key vote for the roll call vote.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 14: On the Nomination: Jim Bridenstine to be NASA AdministratorYea

    Key Vote 14: On the Nomination: Jim Bridenstine to be NASA Administrator

    Between his time as an aviator in the United States Navy, his firsthand experience serving as the executive director of the Tulsa Air and Space Museum and Planetarium, and his work in Congress, Bridenstine is extraordinarily qualified for the role of NASA administrator. In this role at NASA, Bridenstine will have the ability to bring much-needed reform to the agency, implementing the same principles of free markets and government efficiency that he tirelessly fought for in Congress. Serving on the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, Bridenstine became a champion of issues pertaining to air and space exploration.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 15: On the Joint Resolution: Indirect Auto Lending CRA Resolution of Disapproval, S.J.Res. 57Yea

    Key Vote 15: On the Joint Resolution: Indirect Auto Lending CRA Resolution of Disapproval, S.J.Res. 57

    The passage of this CRA would do nothing to change the prohibition against discrimination in the Equal Credit Opportunity Act that the guidance cites. It would simply roll back the gross regulatory overreach of the CFPB in claiming for itself -- behind closed doors and a screen of smoke -- a power that Congress, in the law that created the CFPB, explicitly banned the CFPB from having. As Sen. Moran said, the CFPB “had to work its magic to find a way to regulate auto dealers.” Good governing is done through accountable and transparent processes, not magic.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 16: On the Motion to Proceed: Resolution of Disapproval on Restoring Internet Freedom, S.J.Res 52Nay

    Key Vote 16: On the Motion to Proceed: Resolution of Disapproval on Restoring Internet Freedom, S.J.Res 52

    S.J.Res. 52 would undo the Restoring Internet Freedom Order and reinstate the Obama administration’s Internet red tape. This will hurt tech companies, as well as consumers. Internet access is becoming vital to commerce, and many Americans still lack connectivity. In order to get service to these most vulnerable parts of the country, we need an Internet free of the meddling hand of government, so it can innovate and expand as it did for so many years before the Obama-era regulations took effect.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 17: On the Joint Resolution of Disapproval on Restoring Internet Freedom, S.J.Res. 52Nay

    Key Vote 17: On the Joint Resolution of Disapproval on Restoring Internet Freedom, S.J.Res. 52

    S.J.Res. 52 would undo the Restoring Internet Freedom Order and reinstate the Obama administration’s Internet red tape. This will hurt tech companies, as well as consumers. Internet access is becoming vital to commerce, and many Americans still lack connectivity. In order to get service to these most vulnerable parts of the country, we need an Internet free of the meddling hand of government, so it can innovate and expand as it did for so many years before the Obama-era regulations took effect.

    "Nay" votes scored. Double Score
  • 18: On the Motion to Proceed: Penny Plan Balanced Budget, S.Con.Res. 36Nay

    Key Vote 18: On the Motion to Proceed: Penny Plan Balanced Budget, S.Con.Res. 36

    Sen. Paul’s resolution would balance the federal budget in five years by assuming the repeal of the 2018 Bipartisan Budget Act and from there cutting total outlays by one penny for every dollar spent, continuing for the next five years. At this point, the budget would be fully balanced and spending would be allowed to grow at one percent thereafter. Doing so would reduce spending by $404.8 billion in fiscal year 2019 and by $13.35 trillion over ten years relative to the baseline under current law.

    "Yea" votes scored. Triple Score
  • 19: On the Cloture Motion: Toomey Foreign Investment Amendment to H.R. 5515Yea

    Key Vote 19: On the Cloture Motion: Toomey Foreign Investment Amendment to H.R. 5515

    Sen. Toomey’s amendment would apply the principles of the REINS Act to CFIUS to make sure Congress has a final say on these regulations. This will mean that only regulations that try to address truly predatory behavior will pass, while those that are unnecessary and anti-market will be stopped from taking effect. This was the intent of Congress when it authorized CFIUS and it should not abandon its ability to set policy in this way. Sen. Toomey’s amendment gives Congress this oversight.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 20: On the Motion to Discharge: Spending Cuts to Expired and Unnecessary Programs Act, H.R. 3Yea

    Key Vote 20: On the Motion to Discharge: Spending Cuts to Expired and Unnecessary Programs Act, H.R. 3

    Approving this initial $15 billion rescissions request in full -- pulling back funds sitting in useless accounts that can only otherwise be used to spend more in the future -- is a task that conservatives in Congress should wholeheartedly endorse. It is one of few opportunities to exercise any semblance of fiscal discipline. It is only one small step towards actually tackling Washington’s out-of-control spending addiction, but it represents a chance to begin this fight.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 21: On the Motion to Table the Lee Amendment to H.R. 5515Yea

    Key Vote 21: On the Motion to Table the Lee Amendment to H.R. 5515

    The Lee Amendment ensures that if the government wishes to making any such detention, that it have clear authorization to do so. The entire text of the Lee Amendment is consistent with the Constitution and with the prior Supreme Court cases that govern this issue. This amendment is narrow in scope, and will not hinder our counterterrorism efforts. This is merely to strengthen American citizens’ constitutional protections. The motion to table would kill this important provision.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 22: On the Motion to Table Lee-Cruz Amendment to the Farm Bill, H.R. 2Nay

    Key Vote 22: On the Motion to Table Lee-Cruz Amendment to the Farm Bill, H.R. 2

    This amendment would add work requirements for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), also known as food stamps. The Senate stripped out this pro-work provision from their version of the Farm Bill. Work requirements are important for helping people rise out of welfare and becoming independent of government assistance. A vote to table the Lee-Cruz Amendment would prevent them from being added back in to the Senate text.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 23: On the Motion to Instruct on H.R. 5895 to Enhance Trade OversightNay

    Key Vote 23: On the Motion to Instruct on H.R. 5895 to Enhance Trade Oversight

    The motion to instruct simply states: “[M]anagers on the part of the Senate at the conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the Senate amendment to the bill H.R. 5895 be instructed to include language providing a role for Congress in making a determination under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 (19 U.S.C. 1862).” The administration has misused Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act to unilaterally impose tariffs – which are taxes – for purposes unrelated to national security. These tariffs threaten American consumers with higher prices and American businesses with retaliatory tariffs imposed by our trading partners.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 24: On Passage of the Farm Bill, H.R. 2Yea

    Key Vote 24: On Passage of the Farm Bill, H.R. 2

    This bill makes no effort to reduce dependence on subsidies from the federal government. These subsidies tend to prop up particular crops at the expense of others. Under the last Farm Bill, 94 percent of subsidies went to only six crops. However, those six crops only accounted for 28 percent of production. This is not to mention the fact that one-third of subsidies would go to “farmers” who have a median net worth of $3.8 million. The Farm Bill is one of our nations clearest examples of cronyism for special interests, and the version produced by the Senate continues that tradition, with no attempt at reform.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 25: On the Paul Amendment to H.R. 6147 Nay

    Key Vote 25: On the Paul Amendment to H.R. 6147

    This amendment, sponsored by sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) would reduce appropriations in the minibus by 11.39% across the board. This would result in cuts of $17.5 billion and would bring spending in line with the budget caps in place before passage of the Bipartisan Budget Act. Given that we are rapidly approaching a trillion dollar deficit, this is a necessary step to reining in government spending.

    "Yea" votes scored. Double Score
  • 27: On the Motion to Table the Cruz Amendment to H.R. 6147Nay

    Key Vote 27: On the Motion to Table the Cruz Amendment to H.R. 6147

    This amendment would prohibit funds from being used to carry out the District of Columbia’s recently-passed Health Insurance Requirement Act. The D.C. mandate states that a “taxpayer who fails to pay the District of Columbia shared responsibility payment imposed...shall be subject to all collection, enforcement, and administrative provisions applicable to unpaid taxes or fees, as provided in Chapter 18, Chapter 41, Chapter 42, Chapter 43, and Chapter 44 of this title.” When dissected fully, this includes levying and seizing property, or even imprisoning individuals for choosing not to purchase health insurance.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 28: On the Nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh to the Supreme CourtYea

    Key Vote 28: On the Nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court

    When it comes more broadly to the rampant expansion of the unconstitutional regulatory state, Judge Kavanaugh is perhaps second to none in standing up for the Constitution. According to Kavanaugh, if Congress hasn’t yet opined on a matter of deep economic significance, any regulation relating to that matter should be presumed unconstitutional. He recognizes that lawmaking, under Article I of the Constitution, was delegated to Congress, not unelected executive branch bureaucrats.

    "Yea" votes scored.
  • 29: On the Conference Report to H.R. 6157Yea

    Key Vote 29: On the Conference Report to H.R. 6157

    H.R. 6157 is more of the same profligate spending resulting from a broken budget process and members unwilling to stand up for their campaign promises of shrinking government and reducing spending. The bill appropriates $33 billion more for Defense than the FY 2018 omnibus and $16 billion more for Labor/HHS. It also includes a CR until December 7, setting up votes on a spending package during the lame-duck session that will almost certainly be packed with last-minute giveaways to special interests.

    "Nay" votes scored.
  • 30: On the Motion to Invoke Cloture on the Nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme CourtYea

    Key Vote 30: On the Motion to Invoke Cloture on the Nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court

    When it comes more broadly to the rampant expansion of the unconstitutional regulatory state, Judge Kavanaugh is perhaps second to none in standing up for the Constitution. According to Kavanaugh, if Congress hasn’t yet opined on a matter of deep economic significance, any regulation relating to that matter should be presumed unconstitutional. He recognizes that lawmaking, under Article I of the Constitution, was delegated to Congress, not unelected executive branch bureaucrats.

    "Yea" votes scored.
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